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Welcome to Asmarino Independent.

Press Release
Written by Simon M. Weldehaimanot Fri - 17 Jul

Mock Trials: Thank you!

Now the team’s worry is that expectation is high and the team wants to moderate the expectation by revealing to the public that the film will have several inadequacies in acting, directing … etc. Consumed in logistical arrangements, some of the role players did not even have time to read the manuscript more than once. And there was no director - someone who can look at the work from a viewer’s perspective. There was almost no budget for this project although the filming industry requires millions of dollars in investment – see chart below. To think of filming without having a single session for rehearsal, equipment testing and with limited resource is thus an ambitious venture. It became reality (definitely quality is compromised) because the assistance, moral and/or material of several people who deserve acknowledgment.
Read more...
 
Article
Written by Yosief Ghebrehiwet Thu - 16 Jul

(II) Eritrean Independence: Is It Worth All the Sacrifice?

The sad truth is that the Shaebia man was created to provide solidity to a chimera of an Eritrean identity; that is, nationalism had to be imposed after the fact. Realizing that no enduring identity could be built on easily achievable properties or on strategic alliances only, it was felt a new identity that would hold the country together had to be built from scratch – of course, after demolishing all competing identities. This Frankenstein creature came to be in order to supersede (and not reconcile) what were thought to be irreconcilable parts of Eritrea. That is to say, most of the current ills of the nation could be traced to the independence movement’s attempt to create a cause ex nihilo, given that there was no prior cause that justified its creation.

One doesn’t fight to create a national identity; one fights to keep an identity one already has. The whole Eritrean tragedy comes as result of reversing this natural order. Eritreans don’t realize that the unity they have been fighting for is at the root of all their problems. If there are “unionists” to be blamed for the Eritrean malaise, it would be these unionists.

Related Article: (I) Eritrean Independence: Is It Worth All the Sacrifice?

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News
Written by TML Thu - 16 Jul

Eritrea Famine Devastates Half Its Population

Written by Rose Foran

Eritrea’s famine has devastated nearly half its population and is steadily worsening due to the government’s refusal to cooperate with NGOs. 

According to an Amnesty International report, about half of Eritrea’s population is undernourished as a result of the widespread drought affecting the country.  Famine has plagued the country for nearly seven years, when the first major drought in 2002 bled the country’s food resources dry. 

However, Eritrea’s stringent policies against NGO presence in the country severely limit relief organizations from providing much needed food and medical supplies. 

Read more...
 
Article
Written by Mellese Woldeselassie, Thu - 16 Jul

Why Not the Way Forward for the Horn Dear Col. Dawit Woldegiorgis?

Mellese Woldeselassie

In the outset I would like to humbly tell you what one American educator said when he taught us how to be effective teachers; '' That a teacher should bring himself to the level of the students''. I also always hear some politicians claiming to ''come to political talks or negotiations from the position of strength'', forgetting keeping mutual interests at the forefront as the key to ultimate success. Some use sheer threats to subdue their enemies. Some also use appeasements; guarantee of survival, economic benefits, fraternity, fame etc. as a political weapon. It also surprises many as some politicians approach is not based on the ''win-win or I win and you win principle'' that can solve any problem in the world. As such they never bring any change in any conflict. Why? Because they forget that time tested principles like honesty, patience, generosity or self sacrifice, fairness, respect, openness etc. are good instruments to bring in peace  anywhere.  

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Eritrea Update: Famine and Resettlement Program

Drought
Now it has become apparent that the situation is getting out of control: there is a real humanitarian crisis in the country. If not for the blocking of the people from crossing to the neighboring countries, people would leave the country in hundreds of thousands to save their lives. In general, the government is not responding to the famine ...

Related Articles:
Update on the Famine Crisis in Eritrea: the Landless and Beggars
III) Eritrea, a Nation in Overall Crisis: Coping Strategies in Hard Times
(II) Land Expropriation
(I) NGOs and food aid

Read more...
 
Interview
Written by Pambazuka News Tue - 14 Jul

Pan-Africanism: I am dreaming of course. An Interview with Bereket Habte Selassie

Dr. Bereket Habte Selassie
Realistically speaking, the regional economic organisations that we have today may be used as building blocks for eventual unity. But the ultimate goal should be unity in accordance with Nkrumah’s vision. That is how I see his relevance in our times. I am aware that the two approaches were also present in the 1960s. In fact it was Mwalimu Nyerere’s eloquence and popularity with the majority of African leaders, who were opposed to Nkrumah’s vision, that defeated Nkrumah’s idea of continental unity at the time when the issues were debated at the first and second OAU summit meetings.

This is an area where we can learn from the mistakes of other regions of the world. It took Europe some fifty years to create the European Union (EU). They did it in stages. In 1968, they established the European Economic Community (EEC), under the Treaty of Rome. The original signatories of the Treaty of Rome (France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg), agreed to form a customs union, adopt a common external tariff, and harmonise their domestic economic policies.

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News
Written by Catholic News Service Tue - 14 Jul

Aid official describes starving Eritrean children too weak to walk

Delmonaco, who visited Eritrea in July, told CNS about the poor conditions existing in villages, orphanages and schools. The famine is particularly devastating to those living in remote villages where agriculture is the primary source of survival, he said.

During a visit to one village, Delmonaco was invited into a mother's hut, where he saw firsthand the extent to which children were suffering.

"The children were too weak to talk, too weak to walk and so weak they could not even swat the flies flying around them," he said.

Read more...
 
Article
Written by Amanuel Isak, South Africa Tue - 14 Jul

A Strategic Thinking Needed to End Recurrent Ethio-Eritrean Bloodshed

An Eritrean mother who lost her two sons in East Africa’s border bloodbath between Eritrea and Ethiopia said with tears rolling down, “I sacrificed almost everything to raise and send to school my only two sons and looked forward to their good future but war took them away from me. I will never see them again and I now feel worthless and confused.”
 
Another mother from Ethiopia said, “It is like we mothers are raising our dearest children to be given to war and death at young age. When will this cycle of destruction end?”

Read more...
 
Interview
Written by ANJ Online Mon - 13 Jul

Eritrean Civic Movement-EGS Raises Awareness on Human Rights in Washington D.C after a 4 Days Peace March

The civil organizations before the declaration of the armed struggle have not gotten the attention they deserve due to the fact the political literature is more focused on the armed struggle period. Eritrea had a vibrant civic society and democratic discourse, a parliamentary culture etc before it got annexed by Ethiopia. The emerging and developing liberal democracy culture with all its signatures Trade unions and political parties was crushed by imperial Ethiopia. The version of civic societies that were prevalent during the armed struggle period was basically known as “mass organizations”. Even those they were directly under the control of the liberation movements they played a tremendous positive role in mobilizing the people and materially and finically supporting the liberation front’s to continue the struggle for independence. In most case they did not have relative independence. They were actually controlled and managed by the liberation front cadres. This was typical of the dominant left culture at that period. We are now recipients of both the positive and negative effects of this kind of civic organizing modality.
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News
Written by Michael Abraha – Oakland, California Mon - 13 Jul

Eritrean Youths Disrupt Pro-government Gathering

Professor Gideon Abay

Angry Eritrean youths jeered and booed Professor Gideon Abay in Oakland on Sunday in which he had nothing except praise for government policies in a country which has been described as a “giant prison” by human rights advocates and democratic nations worldwide.

The youngsters were infuriated by the professor’s description that Eritreans fleeing the country were merely lured by better standards of living in the West. Prof Gideon, who has served as mathematics professor in the US for 20 years, was responding to a question from the audience about why so many Eritreans were risking their precious lives crossing forbidding and forbidden African deserts and deadly high seas seeking protection and refuge in unknown lands.

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News
Written by Michael Abraha Mon - 13 Jul

Eritrea: A Call for Concerted Action to Remove Dictatorship

Mr. Mohamed Adem Artaa Central Committee member of EPP
A senior official of the Eritrean opposition, Mr. Mohamed Adem Artaa, has called on pro-democracy forces to take urgent measures to undercut the power base of the ruling oligarchy and isolate it from the Eritrean masses.

Mr. Artaa is Central Committee member of the Eritrean People’s Party (EPP). He was speaking in connection with the recent merger between his party and the Eritrean Democratic Resistance Movement of Gash Setit (EDRMGS).

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Article
Written by Tekeste Negash Mon - 13 Jul

The dilemma of Eritrean identity and its future trajectories

The core of Eritrea´s political, cultural and economic identity is based on colonial premises. The first premise stated that Eritrea had a more developed economic infrastructure than Ethiopia. It has been repeatedly argued that the forced union of Eritrea with Ethiopia turned a hitherto prosperous economy into a poor province/colony within the Ethiopian imperial framework. The struggle for the independence of Eritrea was thus motivated and justified by this kind of reading of economic history. The second premise closely interlinked with the first stressed that the Eritreans are superior (in terms of cultural and political sophistication) to other Ethiopians. Here it is important to note that the comparison is always made with Ethiopia and Ethiopians. The neighboring countries like Somalia and Sudan did not function as identity markers. The third premise (related indirectly to the culture of war extensivle used by colonialism) emphasized the invincibility of the EPLF (the armed movement that succeeded to pull Eritrea away from Ethiopia) ...
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News
Written by Huffington Post Sun - 12 Jul

Obama Ghana Speech: FULL TEXT

Make no mistake: history is on the side of these brave Africans, and not with those who use coups or change Constitutions to stay in power. Africa doesn't need strongmen, it needs strong institutions.

America will not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation - the essential truth of democracy is that each nation determines its own destiny. What we will do is increase assistance for responsible individuals and institutions, with a focus on supporting good governance - on parliaments, which check abuses of power and ensure that opposition voices are heard; on the rule of law, which ensures the equal administration of justice; on civic participation, so that young people get involved; and on concrete solutions to corruption like forensic accounting, automating services, strengthening hotlines, and protecting whistle-blowers to advance transparency and accountability.

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Time Machine
Written by AI Sun - 12 Jul

VoD – Thursday, July 08, 2004

Time Machine: VoD – Thursday, July 08, 2004
 

Examining war begins with very general questions: What is war? How can it be defined? And what causes war? Moreover, what are the relationships between Eritrea and war?

Let’s look at the definition of war first: Cicero defines war broadly as "a contention by force"; others say that war is the continuation of politics by violent means … in other words, when politics fails then war ensues. And the Oxford Dictionary expands the definition to include "any active hostility or struggle between living beings; a conflict between opposing forces or principles."

Eritrea has lived under wartime conditions for decades. I think that sort of life has changed the predisposition of our people. I am sure that applies to our neighboring countries as well. Anyway, it seems our attitudes towards matters of war and peace is somewhat different, perhaps worrying. First of all, Eritrea has never known real peace except during the 1991-1998 time frame. Now, considering the absence of peace, that is to say, the extended exposure to decades of war, do you think that has given rise to a shift in the ways our people think of war? Well, hold the thought. We will come back to this subject, but first let’s listen to the News.

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Article
Written by Mohammed Birhan Hagos Sun - 12 Jul

EPLF's "Eritreanism" in the post independence era

As a rejection of what the ELF allegedly stood for, it revived and reformulated the biases inherent in the Christian highland elite. The lowland Muslims were projected as spineless cowards in the face of serious military challenge. The Issayas group was in this regard reviving and reformulating the myth of military ineptitude that circulated among the police commandos (Hademti Deqi Halima).

The lowland Muslims were also portrayed as hapless illiterate cattle keepers who could not be trusted with managing a complex thing as a nation or its struggle for independence. Finally they were portrayed as people whose Eritreanism is less than skin-deep as they are liable to change it to Arabism at the earliest opportunity. The EPLF's ideology of Eritreanism was thus based on the rejection of the alleged vices of the lowland Muslims, lack of military valor, cultural backwardness and Arabism.
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Article
Written by Milkias Mihretab Yohannes Sat - 11 Jul

Gone too soon... Memories of a great artist and time.

Michael Jackson
 All over the world there are special kinds of people called artists. These uniquely talented and gifted people live, perform, work grow and die among us. Some of them are so blessed and exceptional to be venerated and loved by many even after they finished their earthly existence. These amazing creatures known as artists can be writers, comedians, musicians, dramatists, actors and actress, play writers, authors, and the likes. All societies of the world, from time immemorial to the present day have artists of all genres, and this is solely unique to humans only.(Despite all the gibberish by so called evolutionists, no one have seen a comedian dog or a painter baboon!)
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Article
Written by Samson Redeab Thu - 09 Jul

IN DEFENCE OF “AWRAJAWNET”

It has been considered, rather, a taboo to speak about awrajas in Eritrea. The “Ghedli” era was shaped by Marxism which in turn abhorred the so called narrow regional affiliation because of its destructive force. At least that was the rationale behind it. But, when you see things now, may be there was a hidden agenda behind that rationale. That era is still dictating contemporary Eritrea’s political discourse on identity.
 
Once, an Italian by the name Massimo D’Azeglio said ”we have made Italy, now we have to make Italians”. Probably, the P.F.D.J. think they have made Eritrea and now they are scheming to make Eritreans. And at the heart of that scheme is the policy of dividing Eritrea into new administrative zones.
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Article
Written by Gabriel Guangul Tue - 07 Jul

ANALYSE ASMARA – PART 4

Analayse Asmara
 But the problem is much more dangerous on a national level. We are not dealing with family units or villages now. It’s on a scale of a tsunami that can swallow whole all that stands right in front of it. What most Eritreans fail to comprehend is that they treat the ‘Eritrea’ they love as if it were a family or village affair. They cannot yet see that a nation state operates by a different set of rules. Strangely enough, the current ‘governors’ are aware of this fact that they use all sorts of subversive activities to milk such mentality by playing around sentimental stuff that increasingly contributes to the underdeveloped state of the nation. We should, therefore, be not surprised that Eritrea is being run like a family estate and the young generation is busy doing a ‘chicken run’ in all directions and all over again and it’s ultimate indicator that Eritrea is not a stable state.

Related: Analyse Asmara - Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

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News
Written by Mohamed Keita (CPJ) Fri - 03 Jul

Press, politics at center of Eritrean mock trial

A 2001 edition of Meqaleh. (CPJ)

 Articles published in Eritrea's now-banned private newspapers are at the center of a mock political trial being filmed as an educational documentary this week at Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. Inside a courtroom on the sprawling Tempe, Ariz., campus, a judge of the High Court of Eritrea presides dispassionately, international observers lean into translation headphones, and defense lawyers challenge prosecutors to detail the vague antistate charges against 11 political dissidents. It's a trial that the real defendants were never afforded when they jailed nearly eight years ago.

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Interview
Written by Michael Abraha Wed - 01 Jul

An exclusive interview With Seyoum Tesfaye: A retrospective and a look at the DC Freedom March

Seyoum Tesfaye - chairman of the Eritrean Global Solidarity

 Reporter Michael Abraha got hold of Seyoum Tesfaye - chairman of the Eritrean Global Solidarity to discuss the outcome of the recent pro-democracy events in Washington D.C. Michael first asked him if expectations have been met.

"Our struggle to transition Eritrea to Constitutional Democratic State by now should have been a full-blown dynamic popular movement. The June 18-21 activities measured by our urgent national responsibility are still not enough. That said for an organization that is only 18 months old the effort was a daring undertaking. We wanted to challenge established standards by combining four major projects under one package. Not trying to do something would have been a total failure. Doing something and learning in the process was a golden opportunity we could not miss. Strictly judged by EGS’ cursory “evaluation” of the events we undertook we think we have fared well. We are not wasting time congratulating ourselves. We have launched a thorough evaluation internally to make sure we do not avoid facing our shortcomings. We are going to dissect the agenda, the time line, the tasks, actions, team work, skill, time management , process flow, publicity, dissemination of information, diversity, cost, subject matter etc. in order to learn from our experience and do better next time. We have come out of this experience more united and determined to strengthen and expand the civic society. "

Read more...
 
Article
Written by Mohammed Birhan Hagos Mon - 29 Jun

Sustaining a Nation

Whether we like it or not, the Issayas regime is going to sooner or later collapse under the weight of its own contradictions. The only question is when and the related question of whether by then it will be too late to salvage the nation. The sooner we get rid of the regime, the higher the chance of salvaging the nation. Once the regime is removed we can either overhaul the system and create a democratic one that embraces diversity or we will become a failed state. There really is no other option. The regime cannot be reformed. It can only be overthrown, and completely overhauled in which case we will have a fighting chance of sustaining the nation. A reformed version of the current regime will merely speed up our descent into a failed state.
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Article
Written by Dr. Haben Sun - 28 Jun

My celebration as an Eritrean-American

Dr. Haben
Last year, I celebrated my 30th year of living in the United States of America. I celebrated because the more I stay here in the U.S. the more I appreciate freedom, and the more I admire the founders of this country.  When the forefathers of this country came up with the constitution more than two hundred years ago, I can only say they were inspired to come up with such a small document that was able to ultimately create a society that is free, people who are creative, and communities that are able to absorb multitude of individuals from around the world, and enable them to live in peace and harmony.  (Okay-you critics: I am not naïve; the U.S. has its flaws and is far from perfect. In fact the constitution was written mostly for selective people at first).  However, the wise men put amendments and after over 200 years it has achieved to become what it is now. But with all its flaws, I can honestly say, relative to other countries of the world this country is one of the best ones.  I am content to live in this country and believe me; I celebrate my living here every day.  I wish the leaders of Eritrea come to their senses and start to process the constitution that was drafted by the people of Eritrea in 1997.  If they had started to implement the constitution in 1997, by now Eritreans would have accomplished plenty.  Instead the Eritrean constitution is collecting dust, and I hope one day a change will come when Eritreans will be able to clean the dust off and start working for the will of the people.
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News
Written by Kelit Alazar Sat - 27 Jun

Tes Meharena Received an Award in D.C.

Tesfaldet A. Meharenna owner of Asmarino .com received an award in recognition of his outstanding achievement and excellent services at the recent Eritrean Global Solidarity symposium in Washington D.C. When the award was presented by a distinguished professor and one of Africa’s few constitutional scholars, Dr Bereket Habteselassie, there was jubilation and ululation from the audience and everyone celebrated with tears, screams of joy and finally they rocked the house with “Wesede Ayay Wesed, Wesede Tes Beal Sere” The aura of jubilation left Tes speechless, he tried to utter some words, he looked around, up and down and no words; he was totally over whelmed with joy.

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Alewana (ኣለዋና!)
Written by Alewana Fri - 26 Jun

America got Talent: EriAm Sisters

Haben Abraham and her sisters, Lianda and Salina, make up the trio The EriAm Sisters. With Haben only being 11 years old, Salina 13, and Lianda 15, these girls are well on their way!  Their songs No More, What I Wanna Be, and Never Let Go are really nice.  Haben, Salina, and Lianda all have very beautiful voices. If you have not heard their music or checked them out before, visit their Myspace Page HERE. Listen to their music and show them love!
Read more...
 
Article
Written by Milkias M. Yohannes Thu - 25 Jun

The Role of Free Press in Democratic Process in Eritrea: When the protector becomes a censor

The majority of Eritrean web based press owners, resistance group media outlets and other publication journalists are men of good standing with utmost desire for betterment of Eritrea and Eritreans. But some times, and in some cases most of the times, they are participants in the act of censorship and knowingly or unknowingly contribute to the stifling of not only the free press and media, but to the very idea of freedom and democracy and liberty itself. Almost all opposition groups and resistance movements had enshrined the notion of freedom of expression in their charters, constitutions, principles, etc. But in practice there are problems and if the issue of censorship or self-censorship is not tackled at this stage, I am afraid it will be ingrained in our political culture and thinking and the role of the free press will be severely limited and curtailed in future democratic Eritrea. Freedom of the press doesn’t mean one has to agree with one’s idea or one has to conform to one political party’s agenda or philosophy. Freedom of expression doesn’t mean one’s writing has to please one webmaster’s tastes and feelings. Freedom of expression means the unalienable right to agree or disagree, to support or to oppose, to express your feeling with out fear or any kind of prejudice or harm. 

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Page 54 of 59

Articles

Article
Written by Samuel N. Wed - 23 Apr

Eritrea:The authorized version of events

Eritrea:The authorized version of events

The Eritrean government propaganda are so outrageous that even the hardcore government supporters have to tune-down government propaganda in an effort to make the claims seem less stupid.

Even critics often moderate many of the government’s claims just to make them reasonable enough to be critiqued (for the claims are silly beyond that possible to criticize).

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Article
Written by Tewelde Stephanos Sun - 20 Apr

Unfiltered Notes: Justice Seeker’s Pledge – ‘be nice to other justice seekers’

Unfiltered Notes: Justice Seeker’s Pledge – ‘be nice to other justice seekers’

Such opposite views are prevalent in today’s Eritrea. For those focusing on negatives (camp A), partial truths are exaggerated to conclude Eritrea’s independence was a mistake. For camp A Eritrea was dead on arrival. It is a helpless (I can’t do anything) and hopeless (it can’t be done) mindset that simply stands by waiting for an “I told you so” moment.

The things camp A lists to reach its pessimistic conclusions may well be true. But it is definitely not the whole truth because Eritrea is more than its highland component. Ignoring Eritrea is more than its Muslim component, there is also camp A’s other half that wants to Arabize Eritrea. Fortunately, these two faces of camp A, although very vocal, are not representative of their respective communities. And that is why I still believe there is hope for Eritrea.

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Article
Written by Asihel Betsuamlak Thu - 10 Apr

People Centered Bottom-Up Approach of Uniting: Eritrean Democratic and Civic Resistance

People Centered Bottom-Up Approach of Uniting:  Eritrean Democratic and Civic Resistance

Top-down attempts of unity and alliances were undergoing for the last decade and half with little or no results. Politico-military culture, fragmentation and top-down approaches have been hindering the resistance from achieving the desired unity for democratic change.   Using people centered, citizen owned and civic driven effective bottom-up approach of uniting and organizing Eritrean democratic and civic resistance is urgently needed. The bottom-up approach with its civic and democratic tenets and practices will help transform the outdated politico-military culture into civic and democratic culture by building civic capacity of Eritrean citizens and their institutions.

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Article
Written by Petros Tesfagherghis Wed - 09 Apr

Voices of Justice: Part 2

Voices of Justice: Part 2

Dr Sarah has explained the difficulties of researching in Eritrea. She said the University lacked an academic environment where research can be done freely.   She summarised her presentation as follows,   “Western writers and scholars failed to see the undemocratic culture of the Fronts. Eritrean Elites were blinded by nationalism and did not consider what post EPLF Eritrea will be.  Research is highly controlled by the Government especially if it is policy related to development and welfare.  Data is inaccessible in most cases.  Some scholars who support the Government externalize Eritrean problems and claim Ethiopia poses existential threat. ....

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Article
Written by Bereket Alazar Mon - 07 Apr

Emptying of a Nation

Emptying of a Nation

A nation is being literally killed without bullets fired - mass execution of the third kind. I am not being an alarmist: the facts at hand clearly are cataclysmic. When a nation with one of the smallest populations in Africa ends generating more boat people in the Mediterranean than a war ravaged and totally destroyed Syria with a much larger population, then one needs to sit down and ask the question, “What gives?” ... So you tell me my Eritrean folk, shouldn't we be all alarmed? Are we all Ok while watching Eritrea’s “painless” death? Or am I just fear mongering.

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Article
Written by Zekre Lebona Fri - 04 Apr

Asmara Expo 69: the Lost Age of Industrialization in Eritrea

Asmara Expo 69: the Lost Age of Industrialization in Eritrea

The Eritrean armed struggle squandered the chance for economic take-off that Walter Rostow wrote so much about in the middle of the last century – an opportunity for industrialization that other nations such as South Korea, Singapore and Thailand used. Having missed the industrialization period during its ghedli sojourn, leaving itself with obsolete technology and uncompetitive products, it had to force itself into Ethiopia’s economy using the means of pressure and contraband, forgetting that they were fiercely opposed to the symbiotic relationship with the same entity in the past.

(Picture: Barattelo double-decked buses transporting workers in Asmara)

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Article
Written by Dr. Tadios Tesfu Wed - 02 Apr

A prelude of a quantum leap in Eritrean politics

A prelude of a quantum leap in Eritrean politics

By now, maybe you are expecting to read an April fool. Not at all, the Eritrean politics and quantum mechanics have common denominator. In both cases, the problems to be treated are very small but the frameworks of their solutions are sophisticated mathematics, due to their incompatible property concerning the classical natural law. Sometimes they function, but for sure, nobody understands why and how they function. The last but not the least, they function by chance. ...

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Article
Written by A Tesfamariam Mon - 31 Mar

Counting Eritrea’s Losses and the Immediate Challenges

Counting Eritrea’s Losses and the Immediate Challenges

The primary challenge that is faced by the Eritrean people is how to bring about the required regime change. While the actual change will come by the popular uprising from inside there is need for input from Eritreans in Diaspora. There is need for organized grass roots movement in communities in Diaspora. The UNITY of all the opposition forces outside the country is very essential to effectively support the forces of change inside the country. The outside force has the resources and the higher magnitude of communication skills that is required by the forces inside country. It has also the higher ability of mobilizing support from the International community. ...

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Article
Written by Yosief Ghebrehiwet Mon - 24 Mar

The Eritrean Oblomov: Loving Asmara the Superfluous Way

The Eritrean Oblomov: Loving Asmara the Superfluous Way

Here is a fact that the nationalists would undoubtedly have a hard time to swallow: the Golden Age of Asmara happens to be neither in the Italian era nor in the Independence era; those golden years happen to fall exactly on the reign of Haile Selassie, starting to build up in the 50s to reach its apex in the 60s, only to abruptly end in the early 70s when ghedli showed up at the doorsteps of Asmara in full force. What then explains this riddle, since it doesn’t fit at all with the narrative that the nationalists have been telling the masses? This question has special relevance because the ghedli generation’s concept of modernity was entirely shaped from the impressions that this colonial city had left on them. In fact, it was with the saving of “Asmara civilization” in their mind that they went through hell for 50 years. ...

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Article
Written by Selam Kidane Wed - 19 Mar

R is for reform and R is for reality too…

R is for reform and R is for reality too…

Is positive change from within still possible in Eritrea?

…Yes it is and it might be the only viable way forward in Eritrea… there are one or two pragmatic up there in the inner circle…in Eritrea – people who do recognise that Eritrea is better off without the dictator, but they also know opposing the dictator can prove to be too costly (they have seen far too many purges)  and are hence looking for a way out… an easy way out to get rid of the dictator… if anyone can bring about any viable reform that would provide us some form of a launching pad to make things in Eritrea right again it can only be under the auspices of some pragmatic official… whether we like it or otherwise (and I am very much otherwise!)… such is the trouble with reality…

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Article
Written by Tariku Debrtesion Sat - 15 Mar

The Ethiopia Eritrea No War No Peace Situation has to End

The Ethiopia Eritrea No War No Peace Situation has to End

The Horn of Africa is the most conflict ridden region in the world. The people and the land are devastated by endless wars. The de facto no war no peace policy that has persisted between Ethiopia and Eritrea for the last 13 years affects the lives of millions in both countries and the stability of the whole region. Bringing this conflict to a peaceful resolution is of paramount importance.

The devastating 1998 - 2000 war between Ethiopia and Eritrea cost billions of dollars in infrastructure damage, missed investment opportunities and lost aid, claimed about 100,000 lives, and dislocated millions  of people. Instead of the end of the war bringing peace, for the last fourteen years the policy of both countries has been “no war no peace.”  As bad as open war is, an endless no war no peace situation is insufferable.

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Article
Written by Samuel N. Fri - 14 Mar

Globalization, Imitation and Eritrean Refugees

Globalization, Imitation and Eritrean Refugees

My overall impression of this paper is that I am disappointed. Almost every significant statement is followed by a sentence that ‘moderate’ it to a point that the statement loses its punch-line. The paper then takes off without notice of the challenge it has just presented to its statement.

In fact, after reading the first half of the paper, I had a strong suspicion that the manuscript has been edited to barely meet the requirement of the reviewers. If my suspicion is right then the first half of the paper is a battle ground between the author and the reviewers, where the author dodges the reviewers’ assault left and right.

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Article
Written by Petros Tesfagherghis Wed - 12 Mar

Voices of Justice

Voices of Justice

I would like to express my thanks to the organisers Justice Africa, African Studies and the University of London for organising “Talking Eritrea”.  A series of events at the University of London- School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

The people of Eritrea are honoured by these extraordinary and well organised events.  Having a Government that has subjected the people of Eritrea to gross human rights violations and is mobilising some Diaspora supporters to defend its inhuman actions and intimidate all those who advocate for justice I thought our African brothers in the United Kingdom particularly Justice Africa have abandoned the people of Eritrea.

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Article
Written by Araya Debessay Mon - 10 Mar

The Role of Eritrean Scholars: the Duty to be Unbiased

The Role of Eritrean Scholars: the Duty to be Unbiased

I believe the Eritrean people expect Eritrean scholars to objectively and critically assess the ills of the nation and offer bold and constructive suggestions for the good of their country and the Eritrean people.  Eritrean scholars should assume this responsibility as their national duty and indeed as their obligation.

I also believe Eritrean scholars should not give a deaf ear and a blind eye to the suffering of their people. They should have the moral courage and intellectual integrity to speak on behalf of the voiceless and the oppressed.

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Article
Written by Zekre Lebona Sat - 08 Mar

An Eritrean Story: A Late Apology to a Spinster Sister

An Eritrean Story: A Late Apology to a Spinster Sister

Imagine a canvass of a family gathered together in the typical small rooms in Asmera or other small towns soon after the independence of Eritrea. The family and the neighbors are serenading the surviving male fighters and the occasional guerrilla sister, both completely indifferent to their sister who “chose” to remain a spinster throughout the ghedli era. ...

In the crowd, almost everybody remembers and talks about the “martyrs” who fell in the war, but none of her prodigal siblings offer an apology for her sacrificed womb, which she has keened for untold years. None of her prodigal siblings offered their appreciation for the long and difficult years of care she bestowed on their already dead or aging parents with little means of the war economy. ...

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Wed - 23 Apr

Eritrea - there you are

Eritrea - there you are

We are standing still; on our own

and there you are; so close

yet; so far away

farewell; to a journey in the unknown

 

The time has come

as it always does; for no one

but for us to join; in peace

in loving memory

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Writers Corner
Written by Ararat Iyob Thu - 17 Apr

Serious People - II

Serious People - II

Well, He seems to

have decided to let hurricanes blow

new winds to penetrate

new routes, new waves

hailstorms hit pavements

the seas grow hot

and volcanoes boil

their sweat is carried

to the Red Sea home.

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Writers Corner
Written by Selam Kidane Wed - 02 Apr

Ode to Yohanna’s Baby

Ode to Yohanna’s Baby

In

The small cramped quarters

A lone light bulb dangling above

A baby was born

Her bright intelligent eyes wide open

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Sun - 16 Mar

Figure Out

Figure Out

So self-righteous she was
She put everything right; in the wrong way

So obsessed with truth; he was
He had nothing left to say

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Writers Corner
Written by Ararat Iyob Wed - 12 Mar

Serious People - I

Serious People - I

Along the river Nile, I met the Flame Tree

its long limbs stretching to the sky

the blue hues along with clouds

became the canvas for its drawing

 

Its red-hot flames poked out from the greens

yellow flicker of burning sunshine

telling me that fire burns otherwise

soft petals glowing with color

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Mon - 10 Mar

Shadow

Shadow

broadcasting so heavy a shadow

a shield standing in front

light outcast

in the wild

 

a hunter

in the dark

light years away

a body mass of no weight

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Tue - 04 Feb

Passage

Passage

 

she hands her child

to a woman sitting beside

raise her as your own; she begs

soon after she saw the men; hands-on machetes

 

she became a statistic; number game ...

a faceless victim; a dead torch among many

... a warning

for a genocide in the making

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Writers Corner
Written by Selam Kidane Sat - 01 Feb

Now You See Me

Now You See Me

 

That September we both left Eritrea

Seventeen hours later you were here

I was shot at on the border

Was sold, bought and resold

The map of that trip is scored on my back

Do you want to see? No I didn’t think you would

My best friend was maimed

The other one died in a cell

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Mon - 13 Jan

Twilight

Twilight

Gravitating to unregistered awareness
In fractured identities
In sleeping sickness
In morbid madness

Rising with eyes frozen; dead blank
Lifeless; zombie-like
Despite all signs of life; yet unborn
Just swimming; in the womb of the twilight zone

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Writers Corner
Written by Selam Kidane Wed - 08 Jan

Refugee Go Home

Refugee Go Home

Like the River that passes through
I have no place to call my own
I stop where life wills ...
To let them take what they want ...
And dump what they willl ...
... Then on I will linger ...
Changing names along the way

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Writers Corner
Written by Samuel NA Thu - 19 Dec

The Ten Commandments, PFDJ Style

The Ten Commandments, PFDJ Style

V. Honor your appointed officials, that your days may be peaceful in the land.

VI. You shall not murder. Aim shots below the knee.

VII. You shall not commit adultery. Lest you compete with your colonels and officials.

VIII. You shall not steal. The land and its fruits are consecrated to government.

IX. You shall not bear false witness. Why prolong your torture.

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Writers Corner
Written by Walta Kiflezghi Tue - 17 Dec

Despair

Despair

Full circle once again

it's a depletion of life sources

Dead wrapped in seaweed

instead of a casket with roses

Abandoned in the desert sand

ripped of dignity and organs

Do you hear the cries

of the motherless children?

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Writers Corner
Written by Julie Wed - 11 Dec

Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony for Aster

Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony for Aster

I send my angels to comfort Aster and my prayers for her freedom. I wear a bracelet that I made in her honor. As I take it off at night, and put it back on each morning, I send her my love. I know that one day we will again sit together on a beautiful outdoor patio and share our hearts over a cup of coffee. And when we get to the third round, the blessing round, we will pause and be grateful for the blessing of true friendship.

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Writers Corner
Written by Gabriel Guangul Tue - 29 Oct

Gravity Unloaded

Gravity Unloaded

Stepping on thorns of sand
Breathless; for songs yet unsung
Ballads of untold sorrow; so bad
For that cursed land

Crippled memories rose; burning
For lives still floating
For the drowned and the freezing
With hearts broken; still bleeding

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Writers Corner
Written by Selam Kidane Wed - 16 Oct

The Return Flight

The Return Flight

The Return Flight

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Asmarino

23.04.2014 المنتدى

ድምጺ መድረኽ - 22.04.2014

ድምጺ መድረኽ - 20 04 2014

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